Category Archives: Education

I Love the Company That I Work for Now

I started working as a receptionist with the company I work for back when I had no sales experience. I felt lucky that I was hired. Most places don’t seem to want to hire people who do not have a degree unless they’re applying for a manual labor or retail position. So, I made sure to show my appreciation by working hard. My company works with a lot of high-profile clients and they use consultative selling to negotiate with their clients. I wanted to learn all that I could do that I would be able to move up and work in sales at some point, too.

After I was hired on as a receptionist, I stayed in that position for four years. I began taking on other tasks in my department that go beyond answering phones and taking messages. Soon, I was promoted to assistant to the Vice President. He said that he had been watching me and was very appreciative of my work ethic. It is true that I often went the extra mile to learn and get things done.

Environmental Research Innovation Of Student

Our future well-being as people on this planet depends critically on the well-being of the natural systems around us. And while policy development and management are certainly important factors in protecting clean air, water, and other natural resources, another factor also comes into play: scientific knowledge.

With climate change and global sustainability challenges looming ahead, environmental research innovation will play a critical role in helping the world’s biological systems, communities and industries adapt, prevent further loss, and survive in a way beneficial to human life.

As with the important work coming out of Umeå, universities in all corners of the planet are leading the charge when it comes to addressing the world’s most topical environmental issues. Scientists and researchers not only play a critical role in identifying the concerns which face society both now and in the future, but also in developing interventions to mitigate human impacts.

The Field of Environmental Research

With more challenges facing the world than ever before, the need for solutions is increasingly paramount. The task is anything but simple: not only are current consequences difficult to reverse, but doing so also involves acknowledging and integrating a broad range of social, economic and political contexts.

Accordingly, degrees in environmental research cover equally dynamic topic, including the geological, biological and chemical processes which impact the environment, as well as how they come into play in the world around us (climate change, pollution control, population dynamics, ecosystems and biodiversity, etc.). Students and researchers also have plenty of opportunities to practice — both inside the lab and out in the field.

Why Environmental Research May Be Right For You

Image courtesy of Umeå Univeristy

All academic degrees offer the opportunity to expand your knowledge and make a difference. However, there’s arguably no path more meaningful at this current juncture in human history than environmental studies.

While the challenges are profound, so are the opportunities: environmental research advancements are happening every day at lightning speed. As a student and researcher in this field, you’ll have plenty of space to innovate — in academia or in another environment-related sector. Because while environmental research is comparatively new as a dedicated field of study, it is at the top of the list when it comes to disciplines with relevant and topical real-world applications. And as the recent news from Sweden demonstrates, you don’t have to wait to graduate to start making a difference. Research opportunities exist for students at all levels which allow them to get their hands dirty while getting the planet clean.

Image courtesy of Umeå Tomoya Suzuki

Not to mention that these issues aren’t going away anytime soon. The takeaway for today’s career-minded students? There are plenty of jobs to be found. In fact, the United States Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook reveals that jobs for environmental scientists and specialists have a projected growth rate of 15 percent for the years between 2012 and 2022 — easily outpacing the average for all professions.

One final morsel of food for thought? American Professor of Environmental Science and Policy Rob Sanford once pointed out that, “From an environmental standpoint, the planet doesn’t care if humans are here or not.”  In other words, while the concept of “saving the planet” may be somewhat misguided when viewed through this lens, there’s another very real imperative for today’s environmental researchers: to make our lives more sustainable not just as an overarching concept, but also in terms of our own personal ideals, priorities, and how we choose to live our lives.

Collegiate Traditions Around the World

Screaming Swedes

While listening to the eight-minute long collective howling of 2,000 university students may not be part of your bedtime ritual, it is exactly that for many Swedes thanks to a local university tradition. While no one knows exactly how or why the phenomenon started, some attribute it to the need to release exam-related pressure.

So what happens exactly? Every night when the clock strikes 10pm, Swedish students open their windows or steps out onto roofs and balconies to send forth roars into the night. And while this tradition is believed to have started in the university town of Flogsta, it has since spread to Lund, Linköping and Stockholm.

The takeaway for students visitors to Sweden? In addition to academic enrichment for your brain, your pipes will also get a workout. Early-to-bed, early-to-rise types, however, may want to invest in a pair of earplugs.

A Different Kind of “Fancy Dress” in Finland

Coveralls, also called “boiler suits”, may be a hit on the latest red carpets and fashion runways, but college students in Finland have been working this look at parties for more than half a century. Back in the 1960s, Finnish engineering students donned this type of protective safety clothing before conducting on-site visits. Over time, this practice evolved to be more fun than functional.

Today, frolicking students wear different colored coveralls to signify affiliations with certain fields of study or organizations. And because they’re a form of expression, they come in a broad range of fanciful colors and styles. Additionally, they’re subject to further decoration at the whim of student wearers over their four years of use.

How popular are these boiler suits? Many student organizations sell them to incoming freshman! And while Finland is best known for this tradition, is also popular in Canada and Sweden.

India’s Peculiar Patchwork

India may produce a significant portion of the world’s most sought-after future workforce members, but its students are not all work and no play. In fact, India’s universities are home to a number of different collegiate traditions. Want to improve your sexual prospects? Pay homage to the “Virgin Tree.” Safeguard yourself from failing out of school? Don’t sit on the infamous Arrear stone.

And then there’s that whole “mosquito bat dance” thing in which students have turned warding off the pesky local insects into a dance move, thereby giving whole new meaning to the expression, “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.”

The list of Indian college campus traditions goes on and on. In other words, if India is your international study destination, be prepared to work, but to play, too.

The U.S.: No Stranger to Strange Traditions

It’s not exactly surprising that the U.S. would have a “go big or go home” attitude when it comes to student traditions.  P ractically every one of its more than 5,000 colleges and universities has student traditions of its own, although they vary in terms of level of extremity…and legality. (Here’s a hint: many of them involve naked running through quads, dorms, streets and other campus byways.)

So what are American students up to these days? From stealing cemetery sod from sports rivals and rubbing various body parts of statues for good luck to bedecking campus trees with shoes and building and parading dragon structures around campus, American students keep themselves quite busy keeping up with local traditions. Or what about an entire day dedicated to celebrating nitrogen or an entire night committed to preventing other students from studying for their infamously difficult organic chemistry exams? And did we mention the “quiet clubbing” phenomenon in which students wear wireless headphones to dance the night away in a silent room?

One thing to keep in mind: just as visiting the U.S. feels very different depending on your specific destination, so do these traditions vary widely from campus to campus.

Study in France Guide

images-50With a reasonable cost of living, exceptional geographic location with easy access to both the ocean and the mountains; and multiple top-ranked universities, it’s no surprise that France’s fourth biggest city — dubbed the “Pink City” for its brick-clay colors — is attractive to so many international students.

An added bonus for history buffs?  Toulouse is home to one of the world’s oldest university systems, dating all the way back to the 13th century. And while all of Toulouse’s academic offerings are strong, aerospace enthusiasts have particular incentive to visit: it considered by many to be the epicenter of the European aerospace industry. Indeed, you will find schools such as the National School for Civil Aviation, ENAC, as weel as Polytechnique, INP Toulouse.

Read more about studying in Toulouse.

  2. Grenoble

A frequent contender alongside Toulouse as a top international French study destination, Grenoble’s scenery offers enough incentive on is own. Nestled at the base of the French Alps, this alpine city is extraordinarily beautiful with sweeping views of the surrounding mountains, and yet with easy access to other premiere destinations, including Paris, Italy and Switzerland. Because of its location, Grenoble also draws a large number of international faculty and staff — making for a particularly diverse academic community.

Widely considered a terrific place to learn French, Grenoble is also known for it welcoming people, bustling city center, and fine outdoor activities. (Skiers, hikers and bikers will all find plenty to do here.)

Read more about studying in Grenoble.

  3. Lille

While lacking the same buzz as French cities like Paris, Toulouse and Grenoble, Lille was recently declared to be “France’s most underrated city.” Located in France’s northern region, Lille has also earned the distinction of being home to the country’s most cheerful people. That might have something to do its unbeatable location, which grants residents access to Brussels in 35 minutes, Paris in an hour, and London in under an hour and a half.

Factor in Lille’s vibrant culture known for its extraordinary architecture and the world-famous Palais des Beaux-Arts museum, and it’s no surprise that more international students are discovering this oft-overlooked destination.

 Read more about studying in Lille.

4. Bordeaux

Located in France’s stunning Aquitaine region, Bordeaux — a UNESCO world heritage site — has been described as “an outstanding urban and architectural ensemble.”  And while wine may be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of this well-known region, the local libations are just one thing on a very long list of reasons to study in Bordeaux. A strong public transportation system, status as a player on the European technology scene, close proximity to sunny beaches, and popular football and rugby teams are just a few more of Bordeaux’s appeals.

And then there’s Bordeaux’s academic offerings. A commitment to cutting-edge research, multidisciplinary study programs, and exceptional faculty and staff combine to make Bordeaux a prestigious higher education destination. Bordeaux’s commitment to welcoming foreign students is demonstrated by its breadth and depth of international study programs as well as more than 250 partnerships with universities across the globe.

Which One do You Choose One Year or Two Year Program

While a bachelor’s degree demonstrates proficiency in an academic area, a master’s degree signifies expertise. Think expertise can’t be attained in a single year? Think again. While there’s no arguing that one-year master’s degrees are intensive, in many cases they’re also the quickest path to reaching your goals. So what are the specific benefits of one-year master’s degree programs?

1. They’re Employment-Friendly

If you’re already a member of the workforce, taking two years off for graduate school can seem like a lengthy detour. One year, however, affords you the same opportunity for advancing your career without missing two years of working. In some cases, your employer may even be willing to hold your job while you’re gone, the chances of which are much less likely for two-year programs.

2. They’re Cost-Friendly

There are many reasons to get a master’s degree. That said, they’re also expensive, making them a difficult sell when it’s impossible to definitively quantify ROI. So what’s a master’s degree-minded, budget-conscious prospective student to do? One-year master’s degree programs offer appealing middle-ground: all of the advantages of an advanced degree at a fraction of the cost.

3. They Have Transformative Potential for Your Resume

Master’s degrees can be an invaluable differentiator in a crowded and competitive job market. While adding skills, job responsibilities and other talents add appeal to your resume, a master’s degree is more than a mere line item. Rather, it has the power to transform your candidacy. When time is of the essence, there’s no more efficient way to accomplish this goal than by enrolling in a one-year master’s degree program.

By now this all sounds pretty good, right? But before you sign on, it’s also important to keep the downsides of one-year master’s degree programs in mind, including the following:

1. They Offer Specialized Knowledge, But In a Hurry

Even if it was possible for a one-year master’s degree to convey as much knowledge and expertise as a two-year program, the pace will be significantly faster. For some students, this means taking less material in; for other, it leads to a much more demanding study environment. Conversely, a two-year master’s degree program gives you the time to thoroughly cover all materials in a less stressful setting.

2. Fewer Networking Opportunities

The connections you make in graduate school will stay with your throughout your life. Attending grad school for just one year shortens the time you’ll have to make and develop these connections. A shorter period of study can also impact your future references: will your teachers get to know you and your work well enough to speak on your behalf in the future?

The Two-Year Master’s Degree Program

While a two-year master’s degree covers the same material as a one-year program, it does so over an extended period of time. Which begs the question: why would you opt to spend more time and money for what is essentially the same thing? Well, we’ve got a few reasons that make two-year master’s degree programs a good bet, including the following pros:

1. They’re a Smart Use of Time

The job market is dynamic, and won’t always be in your favor. In times when the job market is unstable, a two-year master’s degree program offers a promising way to strengthen your candidacy during the off time. Not to mention that when you’ve completed your degree and the job market has (hopefully) rebounded, you’ll be positioned for an even better job.

2. They Maximize Learning

If you’re truly looking to increase your expertise in a particular area, then cramming all of that learning into one year can be a challenge. A two-year program, meanwhile, offers ample opportunity to learn everything you want to learn — not just in terms of your future career, but also in terms of your personal enrichment. While one-year programs may only cover the bare essentials, two-year programs offer the chance to delve into electives, too.

3. They’re Ph.D.-Friendly

If you’re considering entering a Ph.D. program at some point, a two-year master’s program best positions you for acceptance. Not only will you enter the pool of candidates with demonstrated expertise and commitment to the discipline beyond what you’d get in a one–year program, but you’ll also have time to make real connections and build relationships with professors who can write stellar references for you when the time comes.

But two-year master’s degree programs, aren’t the clear victor, either. Here are the cons associated with these longer degrees:

1. They’re Expensive

Between tuition and living expenses, a two-year master’s degree program is a much more significant financial investment. Not only that, but you’ll also be forfeiting your real-world salary for two full years instead of one, and there’s no guarantee that you’ll recoup those costs.

2. They Mean a Larger Employment Gap

While employers don’t typically view time off from the workforce for academic studies as a bad thing, stepping away from your career path for two full years can be a somewhat frightening concept. Will you miss chances for advancement while you’re gone? Is it really worth it? With one-year programs, these concerns aren’t as much of a factor.

How to find a Good Reference Letter

images-51This is the part that students find most stressful – choosing the right professor to write the letter. Asking for a reference can feel rather intimidating, but it’s important to remember that most professors have a vested interest in their students’ success and are happy to assist in many ways. That being said, it’s important to approach the right professor. The instructor’s reputation can be beneficial, particularly if they’re well-respected or a leader in their field, but don’t base your decision on prestige alone. Make sure to choose a professor who knows you well – an ideal candidate for a reference letter would be a professor or instructor that you had for several classes over the course of your studies and with whom you have worked recently. It should go without saying that you choose a professor who has seen your best work and who gave you good marks and feedback. But it’s also important to consider the application requirements. If you’re applying for a Masters in Engineering, it may not be very helpful to choose your Poli-Sci professor from second year, even if you did get straight As in her class. Or if you’re applying for a job on a marketing team, it’s a good idea to ask a professor who can speak to your abilities in a group or on collaborative work.

2. Prepare well

Most professors understand that writing recommendations is part of the job, and they’re happy to help. In fact, many professors will be flattered by your request. But that doesn’t mean that you can just pop by and ask for a letter two days before the application is due. First, contact your professor either in his office hours or via email and ask, politely, whether he is willing to write a letter of recommendation. If you receive a positive response, gather all the information the professor will need to write a reference – your transcripts, CV, application instructions, and all the relevant documents – and visit his office hours with the materials. Make sure to include contact information so that the professor can get in touch with questions or requests. If you’re submitting the documents electronically, make sure that they’re clearly labeled and saved in a format that can be opened in many programs, and find out whether the professor will submit the letter or whether you need to collect it once it’s finished.

3. Timing is Everything

Professors are normally happy to help a student they feel have the skills and drive to succeed, especially when that student has performed well in class and demonstrates passion for the subject. But professors are also busy, and a good letter of reference doesn’t just magically appear overnight. Approach your chosen professor early – weeks (or months if possible) before the application is due. Make sure to submit all the necessary paperwork and information to the professor in a timely fashion, and complete as much of the application as possible to save your professor time and effort. If your application includes a personal statement or project plan, have a draft ready and include it with the information you provide to the professor so that she has context for your application. And follow up on your request – if the application is due next week and you haven’t heard from the professor, it’s appropriate to send a friendly and polite email to check on the letter’s progress. But don’t badger your professor – yours may not be the only letter they are writing.

4. Mind your Manners

Remember that your professor is doing you a favor. Be polite when asking for a recommendation, be courteous and organized when providing the necessary documents, and remember to follow up a recommendation, whether your application is successful or not, with a kind thank you note. And, if your application is successful, be sure to contact the professor(s) who wrote letters of recommendation

Are You Plan Study in India

If you’re considering studies in engineering and technology,  in particular, the quality of India’s offerings in these areas are particularly impressive  — known for their constant pursuit of teaching excellence and boundary-pushing research.

But India’s offerings are far from limited to these fields of studies. From politics to philosophy and biology to business there’s something for everyone in India’s massive higher education system. Which brings us to our next point.

2. It’s Home to the World’s Second-Largest Higher Education System

What do you get when you combine 343 universities and 17,000 colleges? The second-largest education system on the planet. Comprising bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees, the vastness of the Indian higher education system and its global network of students and faculty directly translates to increased diversity and enhanced opportunities for both academic and personal enrichment.

3. Unique Courses Abound

India’s higher education system isn’t just vast in size; it’s also vast in academic offerings. The country’s rich past and vibrant future mean a breadth and depth of courses are available — from the classic to the cutting edge. In addition to being exposed to the latest frontiers of science and technology, students also have access to traditional subjects, such as Ayurveda, Sanskrit and Hindi.

  4. It’s Affordable

Compared to many of the world’s finest institutions, India’s low cost of education is a bargain. Additionally, various scholarship, loan, and financial schemes are available to offset the cost. But it’s not just less expensive tuition fees which make studying in English a smart financial choice. The cost of living in India is also budget-friendly. How much so? According to Numbeo, rents in the US and UK are 509 percent and 456 percent higher, respectively, than in India.

 5. It’s Diversity Extends Beyond Academia

If your goal is to see the world, a visit to India is an amazing start. This large country offers incredible things to see and do — from the mountains of the Himalayas to remarkable scenic — and often undiscovered — beaches like Goa, Lakshadweep and Andamans.

When it comes to hospitality, meanwhile, Indians can’t be beat. Where else can you find a popular saying insisting “Athithi Devo Bhava” or “the guest is God.” Factor in opportunities to explore your spirituality, magnificent history and architecture, mouthwatering cuisine and extraordinary shopping, and the list of reasons to visit India continues to grow.

Woried about culture shock? Indeed, it’s a fact of life when traveling to a new country. However, the benefits of stepping outside your comfort zone are far outweighed by the temporary period of adjustment.

Study Engineering in France

French engineering programs are well-known for their rigorous curricula aimed at positioning graduates for successful careers following graduation. France’s selective Grandes Ecoles d’Ingénieur fuse advanced theoretical concepts with practical applications, such as small workshop sessions and paid internships. They also integrate business training, foreign language study, and communication skills, all teaching Diplôme d’Ingénieur recipients to deliver creative solutions to some of today’s most complex challenges.

Standing behind today’s French engineering degrees is The Engineering Title Committee (CTI), the monitoring body tasked with ensuring the ongoing excellence of the country’s engineering education system.

2. Learn In a Culture of Ages-Old Engineering Innovation

Need more proof of the strength of French engineering programs and the capabilities of their grads? Just take a quick look at the country’s legacy of engineering innovation, starting with the TGV (Train à Grande Vitesse or “high-speed train”). World record holder for speed, the TGV is considered to be a technological marvel for its combination of performance, comfort, and commitment to eco-mobility.

And the TGV is hardly alone. The 17th century, 150-mile Canal du Midi which spans from Toulouse to the port of Sète in the Mediterranean is so extraordinary in both vision and execution that it’s earned Unesco World Heritage Site status.

And of course no discussion of feats of European engineering is complete without mention of the Eurotunnel. A joint project of France and the UK, the Channel Tunnel took more than 13,000 workers and five years to complete, and has since been declared to be one of the seven wonders of the modern world.

What do each of these have in common aside from their impressive engineering schemes? They were considered unthinkable until French engineers put their minds to the task. In fact, France recently topped all other European countries for innovation based on Thomson-Reuters’ roundup of the “Top 100 Global Innovators.” With the world facing so many challenges ahead, these past accomplishments speak to the potential of French-educated engineers to make a profound difference in society.

3. The French Language Adds Value

While the importance of knowing English is widely touted, the value of bilingualism is often understated. But as globalization continues to break down conventional barriers to communication, knowledge of a second or more language adds irrefutable value.

In addition to enhancing a student’s ability to communicate, studying French also affords students otherwise unattainable access to understanding French culture and context. These cross-cultural capabilities serve graduates well — both when working alongside other French speakers as well as when communicating with other international students, as well.

In short, adaptability is a “must-have” attribute in today’s complex economic landscape, and amplifying your ability to communicate goes a long way.

  4. It IS France, After All

Mere mention of the word “France” makes most people swoon. While engineering programs are indeed demanding, you won’t spend all your time studying. When you’re not hitting the books, France offers an abundance of unforgettable things to see and do and taste and discover.

And while Paris may get all the buzz, there are plenty of other phenomenal French cities for international students, such as the European metropolis of Lyon. A major technological, industrial and economic hub, Lyon plays host to an impressive network of engineering schools.

International Students Tips

unduhan-49Let’s get this one done and dusted first. Money is often a major stress-factor for students and studying abroad is expensive. Anyone who tells you otherwise is probably trying to sell you something…expensive. But that doesn’t mean that you have to empty your savings or pile up debt to have a great experience. Here are couple tips for smart spending and saving money while you’re abroad:

  • Resist temptation

Don’t buy everything you see when you first arrive, no matter how cool things seem. Stick to necessities and save the souvenirs for the end of your visit. And remember – anything you buy you’ll want to take back with you, so consider your luggage allowance before buying a didgeridoo in Australia or a set of steel drums while studying in Jamaica.

  • Do like the locals

One of the best ways to save money while studying abroad is to live like a local. Cook local foods, or better yet, get a local to teach you how to cook their favorite food. And while you’re at it, ask them what locals do for fun – you’ll get a much better sense of the culture, and you’ll make new friends in the process.

  2. Use the money you saved to travel.

Souvenirs are great, but memories are even better. Use the money you saved by eating local grub (maybe literally in Peru) to travel and see the country and surrounding areas. Your camera and your journal will capture your time a lot better than a t-shirt or a snow globe.

  3. Eat healthy food on a budget.

We’ve already pointed out that eating local can help save money, but it can also help you stay healthy. Burgers and sweets or the go-to college foods (noodles and frozen pizza) might seem easy, but your waistline and your health will take the toll and no one needs that kind of stress. Before you even leave home, take some time to learn a few basic and healthy dishes. Soups, stews, and casseroles are easy and budget-friendly, and they don’t require a lot of complicated kitchen equipment. Learn the ins and outs of a chicken – one decent sized bird can feed a poor student for at least a week if you know what you’re doing with a knife and some basic ingredients. Once you’ve arrived, check out campus and community centers to see if there are any cooking courses offered for beginners or students. We’ve already suggested asking a local for cooking tips, but as an international student you probably have the combined culinary expertise of the United Nations at your doorstep. Why not organize an international food night and ask all your new friends to cook and bring their favourite food from home.

  4. Become a local-transport expert.

It’s tempting to hop into cabs when you’re in a new place, but if you can master the train, underground, or bus system, you’ll save yourself a bundle of money and time. Or better yet, start walking! While this may not be feasible all the time (especially if you live in a big city or a rural location) but you’d be surprised at how walking can often be the quickest, most enjoyable means of transportation. Plus, you’ll see lots of interesting sights and get good exercise along the way!

  5. Prepare in advance

You’ve probably already sussed out the cost of accommodations and transport, but have you considered mobile phone plans? Prescription drugs? Bank charges? All these things can add up, and it pays to plan ahead and know what to expect. Some things, like prescriptions, might be cheaper (or free) in your home country so something simple like talking to your doctor and getting a few months in advance could save you a lot of money and stress. Check with your bank before leaving and make sure you won’t wrack up charges by using your cards abroad. Your mobile phone might be permanently attached to your thumbs, but using it abroad could be a major money pit. Switch to a local SIM when you arrive, or just get a cheap pay-as-you-go phone for the duration of your studies.

  6. Make friends and have fun!

Landing in a foreign country will be a shock no matter what, so give yourself time to adjust but don’t just hide away in your room. Get to know your flatmates, classmates, and other people on campus. And don’t just stick with the other international students. If you’re having trouble meeting people, check out your school’s student associations and join a club or group that shares your interests. Sign up for excursions and get involved in on-campus activities. Go out and mingle with locals – take a dance class or volunteer. Whatever you do, relax. So many students worry so much about making their time abroad a memorable experience that they actually forget to experience anything – so have fun and live! Bon voyage!

What The Great Review in 5 News For Student

The figures are in, and international student mobility is up! In 2015 countries and institutions around the world reported growing and record numbers of international student enrollment. Many countries, including Australia, Canada, China, Japan, New Zealand, Poland, South Africa, and Turkey have been working to increase their international student numbers and given the success of various initiatives, the trend in international student mobility looks likely to continue to the end of the decade. In 2015 international education became Australia’s fourth largest export, and the Australian government is working to continue growth in the sector. In the Netherlands, international student enrollment was lagging behind the European average, but in 2015 the country saw rapid growth and now international students account for up to 62% of student populations in some Dutch institutions. The US has long been a leader in attracting international students, but in 2015, the study-abroad powerhouse saw an impressive 10% increase in enrol lment, with a huge jump in STEM field enrollment.

  2. Countries Around the World Developed Partnerships

Growing numbers of international students show that programs designed to increase overseas student mobility are successful, and more and more countries are working to develop initiatives that draw students to their institutions and encourage mutually beneficial cooperation. 2015 saw a jump in collaboration between East and West, with the UK and China, the UK and Vietnam, Japan and Australia, and India and Australia all announcing cooperative plans to increase student mobility, simplify application and credit transfers, and open borders for education and post-graduate employment. All of the partnerships were based on the understanding that by working together to educate students, countries can grow their economies and support innovation.

  3. Ireland Instituted a New Reform Program

University systems around the world have been struggling during the economic crisis of the last decade, but countries like Ireland are working to improve standards and remain top destinations for international students. In July, Ireland announced the new reforms aimed at simplifying application processes for international students and making it easier for students from abroad to live and work while they study at Ireland’s well-respected institutions. The Irish government planned to implement the changes this past autumn, so we’ll have to wait and see how they affect the international student experience in the Emerald Isle. Ireland’s initiative mirrors that of several other countries that are working to open borders to international education and help overseas students pursue advanced studies in an increasingly challenging economic climate.

  4. Obama Wants to Make Community College Free

Speaking of helping students financially, the American President Barak Obama wants to make higher education more accessible to American and international students. Earlier this year, Obama announced his intention to make community college universally free to students with GPAs above 2.5. The plan, if implemented, could cost the US $60billion in the next decade, but the President’s plan proposes dividing the cost between State and Federal coffers. Universal higher education exists in many countries, and in the US similar programs operate on a small-scale within individual states or communities, but it remains to be seen whether Obama’s initiative will have support from US law-makers in the Senate and Congress.

  5. Erasmus+ Got More Money and a Wider Scope

The Erasmus program is one of the world’s biggest players in international student mobility, and in 2014, the program announced the establishment of Erasmus+, which would incorporate all of the existing EU student mobility programs. The new program was a major success with record numbers of applicants and in 2015 Erasmus+ committed an additional €15 for the next funding cycle. Erasmus+ grants help to foster mobility and inclusiveness for students from around the world, and the next cycle of applications will focus on grants for under-represented areas. The new program was wildly successful, with overwhelmingly positive feedback from applicants.